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Alcoholics Anonymous And The Steps

The Start Of Alcoholics Anonymous


Continuously providing help and support to alcoholic addicted persons for 80 years is what Alcoholic Anonymous (AA) does best. The group was founded by Bill Wilson and Dr. Bob Smith who are both recovering alcoholics in 1935, it began as a community-based fellowship in order to encourage sobriety in many recovering alcoholics. The journey to recovery is aided by the 12 stages that guide the operations of AA. The 12 Steps are still followed, and many recovered alcoholics say belonging to an AA group saw them through the recovery journey.


There are more than 50,000 AA groups in America alone and over 2 million members in the world.


What The Aa Meeting Entails

It can be extremely intimidating and uncomfortable to come to a conclusion to attend an AA meeting, especially for individuals who have no idea about what to expect. It requires the individual to venture out of his or her comfort zone and admit before a room full of strangers that they have a problem and need some assistance to get better. This feeling is felt by most of the people you'll encounter in the meetings. It must be understood that the organisation was founded by recovering alcoholics, and the model has served the community well even to this day. Everybody in the AA programs even those running them has gone through the program at some point, so they empathize with members.


New members are made to feel comfortable They are encouraged to join the conversations though no one will force them. AA realises that there are people who feel uncomfortable when sharing info about private matters during their first visit. After the members has started sharing their experience with others, they'll start seeing some positive changes in their lives.


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The Differences Of Open And Closed Aa Meetings

Closed AA meeting is open only for people who are recovering alcohol addicts or the people who are interested in knowing more about how to overcome their addiction.

Partners, family and pals are allowed to attend open meetings. You have the option of deciding whether you want to attend a closed meeting or an open meeting depending on your comfort level within the organisation. Some individuals want to keep these meetings as a separate part from the other activities. For others, the love and support of friends and family members during meetings is important.


The Twelve Steps For Aa

Alcoholics Anonymous is the first group that came up with the 12 stages of achieving addiction recovery which is currently being used by other communities. The steps are meant to be followed as a cycle although they are listed linearly. A patient may repeat a particular step until they are certified with the results.

The first step includes admitting that you have a problem, and really need help to solve it. Making yourself a promise that you'll recovery from the addiction, accepting your mistakes and the wrongs you have done to others are some of the stages that you must go through in the process. Here is ore information about the 12 stages of recovery.


Why Some People Do Not Go To Aa

Withdrawal symptoms and other uncomfortable things one goes through as they try to quit alcohol abuse discourage many from attending the AA meetings. The resistance people have towards attending AA include:

  • They do not believe these meetings will be helpful
  • They are afraid of confronting someone they know
  • They aren't sure they really have a problem

It is important at this stage to focus on the fact that you have genuine reasons for having considered going to the meetings in the first place even if the other reasons are weighing heavily on you.

Accepting your condition and seeking help is the main objective. Attending a meeting can possibly save you from years of heartache caused by your alcoholism it can in no way be harmful.


Identifying An Alcoholics Anonymous Group

Regardless of where you are living you will not have any difficulties in finding an AA group within the locality. Most groups have regular meetings, and you can definitely visit one sooner rather than later. We can help you identify the AA meetings near your location and you can choose the type of meeting you want to attend. Please contact 0800 246 1509 today so we can help you find a reliable AA group to help you today.